Cycling tweets & cyclists on Twitter

I'm still not sure what to make of Twitter. Ken Roberts, cycling 45,000 miles round the world, has only just begun tweeting after 10,000 miles. I hope this doesn't mean he stops blogging as did, for example, www.goingslowly.com whose previously interesting cycling blog more or less dried up last December when they went over to Twitter.

Twitter is undoubtedly a way for cyclists to be able to communicate with each other. On CycleSeven's Twitter account I can communicate with Olympic cycling gold medallist Victoria Pendleton or one-time round the world cycling record holder James Bowthorpe (or anyone on Twitter for that matter). Even if I decide not to tweet them directly I can still follow Victoria, James, and Bradley Wiggins by reading their tweets, but it's rare for one single tweet to be interesting in isolation (unless it links to something longer than 140 characters). On Twitter you are only reading fragments of virtual conversation and must delve deeper to make sense of it. Of course I can communicate with Ken Roberts on his blog.

I see a use in being able to tweet back to Twitter friends from, say, a cycling tour, especially as it's easy and cheap to tweet texts or twitpic some photos from a mobile phone. But is anyone really interested? So far we're just tweeting each blog post with a link back to it, so there's little point in feeding 'Latest Tweets' on the blog. Perhaps some time I'll see the reason for spending more time tweeting, but at present I don't. At least with blogging you're creating an accessible archive for the future. Tweets on Twitter disappear into nowhere.

5 comments on “Cycling tweets & cyclists on Twitter”

  1. Alan wrote:

    I confess I've never tweeted in my life. Perhaps now is the time to learn.

    I notice we have 14 followers, only one of which is you!

  2. Patrick wrote:

    LOL

    Yes, a grand total of 14. My personal Twitter account has been pretty quiet since December 2009.

  3. Takano wrote:

    I think most of time it is useless. But it is good when you want to have some news from somebody like Alberto Contador to get direct oppinion from him without intermediary, even limited to 140 characters. Sometimes a simple word like "yes" or "no" says everything. . .

  4. Chris wrote:

    I'm not won over by the microblogging on Twitter. Perhaps it's because virtually all the comments I've read on various Twitter pages don't make much sense to me. Maybe I should keep at it. I probably won't.

  5. Patrick wrote:

    Me neither. I see Takano's point about direct opinion but I would be surprised if Contador tweets really are straight from the heart (I can't read Spanish anyway).

Leave a comment

Add a Smiley Smiley »